Tag Archives: primary grades

End of Year Ideas

Keeping your sanity during the tornado of paperwork and checklists at the end of the school-year can be tough. Sometimes the time spent in the classroom can just slip away. It’s important to have designated times when you create something as a cohesive group. This can be anything from group parallel play to a project that requires costumes and collaboration. Depending on your group dynamic, that choice is yours. Do whatever they can handle, and it will be memorable.

Harlem Shake Videos:

Last year, the Harlem Shake was all the rage. Basketball teams, groups of friends, news crews, casts, and more were getting together to create their own Harlem Shake videos. We decided that, as a class, we would make costumes, and take turns being the one in costume. The kids absolutely loved it, and now they have a video to remember their time in our class. There are free apps that make it easy to create your own Harlem Shake video.

Bubble Party:

To celebrate ending the 6 days dedicated to the NYS ELA and MAth assessments, we decided to have a bubble party. Shockingly, the exams still require students to “bubble in” their answers throughout the tests.

Later on, we also made sure to get our co-workers a bottle of champagne to have them also celebrate the end of bubbling in names and codes.

Classroom Stories:

One idea is to have students create their own stories using the kids in class as their characters. The level of support given to this activity depends on your students’ age and needs. This activity will give each student a chance to be creative, while at the same time, creating something that will allow the child to always remember his classmates. If your students need more support, you can help the students generate ideas. If the child struggles with writing, you can type up most of the book, but leave some words that the child can write in themselves. On the back, you can include the picture of the “author” with a short blurb about the students, giving the story the look and feel of an actual book. You can then choose to combine the stories into one big book to send home or give copies of each child’s story to the students to bring home.

Time Capsule:

In the beginning of the year we had students fill out various items for a time capsule. Each student wrote their a few of their favorite things, such as their favorite book, food, school subject, and what they want to be when they grow up. We even took a picture for them to glue on the cover, traced their hand size, and wrote how tall they were. During the last week of school we complete the same activities again and compare the results! It’s so fun to see the growth of students over so many dimensions.

Video Clips:

My students love the opportunity to be on camera. Any activity is instantly more exciting once students find out the end result will be a video. I plan on brainstorming students’ ‘favorite thing from this year,’ together before writing some ideas down on a ‘script.’ Students can share their favorite memories on camera, then we will watch the videos together as a class. As an added bonus we will post the videos on our class blog for students to watch at home with their families.

 

This post was collaboratively written by Jess, Caitlin, Anthony, and Katherine.

 

Quotable Moments

“Wait, she’s a girl. Why does she have mister in her name?”

One of the great things about working with kids is that they will openly ask about what might confuse them or pique their curiosity. As adults, we tend to tuck that puzzlement away. As teachers, we are in awe of the children and how they  speak their minds honestly and ask questions without hesitation. We put together some of our favorites; we hope you enjoy.

Jess:

At school, I go by Ms. Durrett. I’ve been called Ms. D and Mr. E. When you say my name quickly, it comes out sounding more like Mr. Ett. Furrowed brows and tilted heads are common responses when children first hear my name. Countless times, I have taught the lesson about my name. I write out Mr. Ett and Ms. Durrett. We read each of them separately and then together. I explain my name is Ms. (pause) Durrett. Sometimes I think it might just be easier to go by Jess.

Caitlin:

My students consistently shock and amaze me with their honesty. Their naive and curious minds generate some interesting observations. “Ms. Mandy… are you sure you want to wear that shirt? It makes your belly fat,” was one of the first times a child made an unexpected comment about my physical appearance. How do you respond? You laugh and appreciate their ability to express themselves so honestly.

Not only do they share these hilarious thoughts, they pick up on any slight difference they may notice. A haircut, new bag, or shoes could take all of three seconds for a child to notice. I recently purchased a new set of eyeglasses. They’re a bit bigger than my last pair, but my students have seen me wear glasses throughout the year. The first day I wore them to work, one of my students entered the classroom to make sure all of his teachers were accounted for. As he scanned the room checking each of us off in his mind, his eyes met mine, and he exclaimed “WOAH! WEIRD, BIG GLASSES MS. MANDY!” This turned into a conversation in which he advised me to return these glasses, and continue wearing my “first pair.” Following this chat, he made sure to have every other child in our class “check out the weird glasses Ms. Mandy has on her face.”

 

Some favorite quote worthy moments:

During a lesson on parts of a book:

Teacher: It’s the spine of the book.

Student: Ahh… it’s a spider!

Questions you don’t know how to answer:

“What is your favorite tent?”

And then they can say some of the sweetest things:

“My teachers are my friends.”

A growing sense of the world:

“I eat pickles. It’s the only indian food I eat.”

“We lit that thing with the 8 candles. I think it’s called a Miranda.”

Body awareness:

“I can’t even stop farting.”

“How many times did you burp in your pants when you were a kid?”

“Uranus is disgusting.”

“No! Uranus is soooooo beautiful!”

“Look how floppy my legs are! … It’s like a raw yolk!”

Random moments:

“Your chapstick smells like a toucan. Wait, no… it smells like a venus fly trap.”

“I like saying Lesbian. Lesbian.”

“One time I was a bully back in Brooklyn…”

“If you could have one wish what would it be?” “To be a ball.”

“Are you doing that already? Are you smelling your armpits already?”


These moments make us smile and laugh and admire the wonderment and awe of a child’s world. They remind us why we teach and how valuable each moment is. There are a million quotes we haven’t recorded, but at least we have these few to remind us of the joy we get from the kids we spend our days educating. For all the teachers who are not yet writing quotes, do it now!

To Email or Not to Email?

Parents have been reaching out to me to ask about allowing their children to have their own email accounts. While email can be a valuable tool for children learning written communication skills, there are, of course, questions that need to be considered.

Checking in with parents about their concerns about their child’s use of email helps to figure out what may be the right approach. Is a concern that they can sign up for things (Facebook, Instagram, etc.)? Is it about who might send them messages? Is the concern about the child’s ability to filter information? Is it about what the child may put in writing? Is it about knowing what children are writing?

Based on each child’s situation, there are options for email accounts. Parents can create an account that is monitored by having the incoming emails forwarded to them. This can be just to be ready to have conversations about links you shouldn’t click, what to do if a stranger writes, how much information to give online, etc.

Children are learning in an increasingly digital world and what they need are the skills to navigate it. If filters are so strong that children aren’t exposed to any questionable material, then they won’t learn how to problem-solve or react once they are on their own in the digital world.

There are a number of companies that provide services for children’s email accounts. These services are a great start for teaching email basics. Once children begin to understand the ground rules, it’s always easier to move them to a less restrictive platform.

While it’s necessary to know what your child is doing online, it’s even more important to talk to them about situations they may encounter. It’s also important to consider how much privacy your child deserves in terms of communicating with friends and relatives. Think about how important it was to write private notes to friends and family when you were young.

As nice as it would be to be able to give a blanket response to this question, there are so many considerations that come into play. I hope that some of the questions raised in this post will help parents make the decision that is right for each child.