Tag Archives: parents

Asking for Support

Dear followers, A fellow writer and educator is going to be running a 5k to raise money for her school. I agreed to be a team member to help reach as many people as possible to support the school and cause. 

Here’s a note from her:

Many of you have supported me in the past and some of you are new invitees to my circle of supporters. I will be running in two races in the near future for my cause. The first one, which will take place in less than two weeks, is the 13.1 mile race that many of you sponsored last year, but I became injured and sadly was not able to run. As promised, I am running in a half marathon on Sunday, March 16.

The second race will  be on May 10th and is a special run/walk dedicated entirely to the Lucy Daniels Center in honor of National Children’s Mental Health Month. It is for this special event that I am asking for your support.

Show your support here:

http://www.crowdrise.com/insideout5k/fundraiser/jenniferreid

I strongly believe that the combined efforts of many are what make the biggest difference in our world.

I guarantee that your help today will make a difference in a young child’s life.

Why do I ask for money for this cause every year?

Every year, I witness the pain a child feels when he is scared and doesn’t feel understood. I see what happens when children are overwhelmed with emotions that affect their capacities to make friends, learn, play, and do things that many of us have taken for granted… things as simple as venturing off for a day in kindergarten. This is what I do. This is my cause. Please help ensure that children receive the care they deserve.

Please make a donation today:

http://www.crowdrise.com/insideout5k/fundraiser/jenniferreid

More info from Lucy Daniels Center:

The Lucy Daniels Center has been working on the forefront of children’s mental health awareness, bringing positive emotional change to thousands of children and their families from the inside out. We are proud to be the largest and most comprehensive children’s mental health agency in the Triangle area of North Carolina. Join us on May 10, 2014 in celebration of National Children’s Mental Health Month as we walk to help ensure that help and hope are available for those in need. Please join us as we improve young lives and our communities one step at a time. Every journey begins with that first step!

Thank you for your time and your generosity.

 

 Please remember:

·         All donations are 100% tax deductible.

·         1 in 5 children in the US have a diagnosable mental health challenge. Most do not receive help and are alone with their troubles.

·         All levels of support and the generosity of donors help ensure that children receive help and services early in life. No donation is too small. It all adds up.

Thank you so much for all of your support! 

The Power of Relationships

As humans, most of us understand the importance of building relationships with each other. Reflect a minute on how much harder you work for the people close to you who understand and care about you– the people who appreciate and admire your strengths and recognize your weaknesses as areas to grow. As teachers, we spend time building relationships with coworkers and children in order to make the more challenging times in the day run a little smoother. Beyond the in-school relationships, there are the relationships with the families, which can sometimes feel like the last thing on your mind when you’re first teaching (until conferences, that is). Creating a relationship with what’s best for the child in mind is critical, especially in the field of special education; it opens you up to be a team with families to problem-solve what will work best for the child.

I can remember in graduate school when a professor explained that sending home positive notes about children is an important strategy for communication with families– to always start out on a positive note. I took this and made it a to-do for myself as a teacher. Reflecting about it in terms of the whole picture has led me to what I think is a better way of framing this strategy and advice:

As a teacher, you are a professional who works with the child and the family to help the child be more successful in the world. In order to make the most powerful impact, there needs to be a relationship with the family– not just a tally of triumphs and challenges communicated to the family. Both the positive and more challenging notes should be about who the child is– not just what the child did. Highlighting your understanding of the child is what will build your relationship with the family; it needs to be thoughtful and sincere.

The moments you live for when you teach– the triumphs– when feelings are expressed with words, concepts are understood, or a splash of independence comes out, those are the moments that families live for too. Being realistic and compassionate will give those moments the celebration they deserve.

 

On a connected note: Click here