Tag Archives: flipped classroom

Continuing the Flipped Math Class

Math has been on my mind a lot lately, which is evidenced by my series of recent math posts. The idea of giving the children work to do on Khan Academy on Fridays is working out really well. Clicking around the site has helped me to see how well-differentiated I can make this flipped classroom. Each child has his or her own login, which helps me to track their progress. In addition to tracking the progress, I can coach them and suggest specific strands to work on.

What this does is free up our time to solve real-world problems in the school during math. As we’re working on measurement, I had them do a project in the art room to measure for a tech installation. They came up with two solutions, and we did a shared writing activity to describe the solutions. After that, they each drew diagrams illustrating the solutions and gave reasons to go with their individually chosen solutions.

This complex, real-life problem was so illuminating to me as a math teacher. It allowed me to coach them through the process and see exactly where the challenges were– more so than any dry word problem in a book. They were also very motivated to be at the head of this meaningful project for the school. I’m looking forward to continuing this kind of work with my group.

 

 

A Flipped Math Classroom

I’ve been fascinated in the idea of a flipped classroom. The children I work with are grappling with much more than just how to do math problems. As a result, instructional time can be eaten up with the needs of the class. My schedule this year has allowed me to try out the flipped classroom in a controlled setting. Math is scheduled Monday through Friday, but I am not in on Fridays. There is coverage for my group, but they have been spending the time playing various math games. Over my December break, I had time to think about what the group should be doing to help them with the projects we work on when I am at school. I signed them each up for an xtramath account to strengthen their facts, and I started giving them specific math videos to watch on Khan Academy. I formatted the group, so they can practice their quick facts on xtramath. When they feel ready to move into content, they go to Khan Academy to watch videos and complete activities. I took the time this week to teach them the navigation skills needed for working independently on Fridays without me. There are a lot of skills they need on the computer before just handing the assignment to them, and the lessons gave them time to learn the routine. By yesterday, they were confident. What amazed me was that the same content I’ve been teaching was all of the sudden much cooler when in a tutorial video online– I think kids get sick of hearing my voice. The kids loved the control and the fact that it was on a computer. I can pick different videos for different children to help with the specific skills they need to hone. Fridays will now be much more productive, and I’m also collecting data! It’s so convenient, and the motivation and engagement has increased significantly.

Keeping Organized

I’m the kind of organized person that has labeled boxes in my apartment for everything from dog supplies to checkbooks to stamps to matches. Everything has a place… and usually a color, too. My classroom was always well organized as well.

I’ve been exploring with the best ways to keep my digital life organized for myself and for the people I provide resources for. So far, I love Dropmark. It’s visual, easy to organize, quick to load, and there are different levels of privacy for each category. I’ve found it so helpful for the lessons I teach. All I need to do is send the link or link it to a QR code in order to share it with my groups.

I’ve also been collecting resources for teachers to begin to use in their classrooms and to start the flipped classroom model. The idea of the flipped classroom is to provide learning opportunities at home, too. Providing families with meaningful and safe resources for their children to explore at home will help children to see that screens can be used for more than games. It also means that the instruction in the classroom will be more rich with more knowledge about topics than a teacher could provide in a 30 minute lesson.

Here’s the beginning of my Dropmark. Check it out!