Tag Archives: elementary ed

End of Year Ideas

Keeping your sanity during the tornado of paperwork and checklists at the end of the school-year can be tough. Sometimes the time spent in the classroom can just slip away. It’s important to have designated times when you create something as a cohesive group. This can be anything from group parallel play to a project that requires costumes and collaboration. Depending on your group dynamic, that choice is yours. Do whatever they can handle, and it will be memorable.

Harlem Shake Videos:

Last year, the Harlem Shake was all the rage. Basketball teams, groups of friends, news crews, casts, and more were getting together to create their own Harlem Shake videos. We decided that, as a class, we would make costumes, and take turns being the one in costume. The kids absolutely loved it, and now they have a video to remember their time in our class. There are free apps that make it easy to create your own Harlem Shake video.

Bubble Party:

To celebrate ending the 6 days dedicated to the NYS ELA and MAth assessments, we decided to have a bubble party. Shockingly, the exams still require students to “bubble in” their answers throughout the tests.

Later on, we also made sure to get our co-workers a bottle of champagne to have them also celebrate the end of bubbling in names and codes.

Classroom Stories:

One idea is to have students create their own stories using the kids in class as their characters. The level of support given to this activity depends on your students’ age and needs. This activity will give each student a chance to be creative, while at the same time, creating something that will allow the child to always remember his classmates. If your students need more support, you can help the students generate ideas. If the child struggles with writing, you can type up most of the book, but leave some words that the child can write in themselves. On the back, you can include the picture of the “author” with a short blurb about the students, giving the story the look and feel of an actual book. You can then choose to combine the stories into one big book to send home or give copies of each child’s story to the students to bring home.

Time Capsule:

In the beginning of the year we had students fill out various items for a time capsule. Each student wrote their a few of their favorite things, such as their favorite book, food, school subject, and what they want to be when they grow up. We even took a picture for them to glue on the cover, traced their hand size, and wrote how tall they were. During the last week of school we complete the same activities again and compare the results! It’s so fun to see the growth of students over so many dimensions.

Video Clips:

My students love the opportunity to be on camera. Any activity is instantly more exciting once students find out the end result will be a video. I plan on brainstorming students’ ‘favorite thing from this year,’ together before writing some ideas down on a ‘script.’ Students can share their favorite memories on camera, then we will watch the videos together as a class. As an added bonus we will post the videos on our class blog for students to watch at home with their families.

 

This post was collaboratively written by Jess, Caitlin, Anthony, and Katherine.

 

My Five Favorite Apps for Kids So Far

Working with teachers to find appropriate apps has had its ups and downs this year. Teachers (myself included) first think to look for goal oriented apps. For example, sight word apps or math facts apps. Goal-oriented apps generally imitate flashcards or encourage impulsive answering. Neither of those is exciting or valuable in other settings. They also think of game apps as a separate category. My view of game apps is that they have a therapeutic value, but children are already play them at home for the most part. I’ve been on the hunt for something a little more challenging that teaches problem-solving skills—but is still engaging. Thinking of the greater brain processes has helped to find more meaningful apps. Amazingly, kids love these apps just as much, and they can be used independently.

Tynker

Although the web-based version has more free games, this app is great for teaching the basics of programming. Kids love this game and choose to play it during downtime when they are not given the choice to play a game like Angry Birds or Temple Run.

Click here For iPad version 

Logic Puzzles

Children get the same kind of satisfaction solving puzzles that adults do. This logic puzzle app helps children with logical thinking skills by challenging them to use limited evidence to solve a puzzle. This is a great team effort app as well.

Click here for Android version

Click here for iPad version

Tellagami

Tellagami has been great for helping students to express themselves in more meaningful ways. There are options for personalizing a character (gender, skin color, outfit, background, etc.) that says what the student decides. Once the character is created, the student can either speak the script or write the script for the character. I prefer this app over Talking Ben because it is more realistic and works on a variety of skills (expression, spelling, creation, etc.). It can be used for book reviews, blog posts, field trip recaps, etc.

Click here for Android version

Click here for iPad

Qrafter

This app is great for reading QR codes. There are a number of apps out there that do the same thing, but the layout on this one is nice. As much as I would love to do more advanced augmented reality, this technology is more reliable (at this point). Within the computer lab, students have created an interactive timeline with QR codes with the focus on computer history. Next plan is a school-wide timeline that stretches up the stairs.

Click here for iPad version

And of course a game that can be used for fun (and problem-solving):

Blokus

If you’re looking for a game to challenge students with their spatial problem-solving and planning, then this is a great option. The game is never the same twice and the rules are simple enough to learn.

Click here for iPad version

There is a vast selection of apps, and I’d love to hear the more meaningful and challenging apps you use in your classrooms.

Oops! …a Teachable Moment…

I, in my haste, planned a quick lesson on explorers for one of my classes. A link had been sent to me by a colleague to a site that was designed to teach about reliable resources. I quickly looked for the assignment on the site, read it, and determined that the assignment was appropriate for the group I was teaching. I scanned the links in the site without really reading through them. The result was that I had to think on my feet.
As the children began reading, the teachers and I started to notice some strange and false facts about the explorers. Then it dawned on us that the site purposely had false information on it to teach kids about finding reliable resources. Close to the end of the period, I asked the students if they read anything that didn’t sound quite right. Only a few had noticed. I had a conversation with them about content on the Internet and how anyone can write anything, even if it’s not true.
They were shocked. I explained that even I was tricked. They loved hearing that! In a way, the lesson worked out fine. Ideally, I would preface lessons like this with an introduction to what I want them to think about as they’re reading. Next time, this group will be comparing the text on the site with more reliable resources and finding the mistakes in the writing. After that, they will be writing blog posts about it. Can’t wait!