Tag Archives: children

Combining Cooking and Technology

This spring, Katherine and I have been running a combined technology and cooking club. We’ve taken the cooking club that teaches children to navigate a recipe and we added technology as a way for them to share what they’re learning.

It’s a pretty big group of kids to manage in the kitchen, so having assigned jobs is a necessity. The are seven students, and we’ve broken the club up into the following jobs: recipe reader, three recipe mixers, videographer, photographer, and two bloggers. As we rotate through the jobs each week, Katherine and I manage different aspects and pick up the eighth job, as needed.

The kids absolutely love being involved with all the aspects of the club. We have been using the KidBlog platform, which has been awesome. They are so proud to write about and publish their experiences. It’s amazing to find a way to inspire the writers and cooks within them.

The Power of Relationships

As humans, most of us understand the importance of building relationships with each other. Reflect a minute on how much harder you work for the people close to you who understand and care about you– the people who appreciate and admire your strengths and recognize your weaknesses as areas to grow. As teachers, we spend time building relationships with coworkers and children in order to make the more challenging times in the day run a little smoother. Beyond the in-school relationships, there are the relationships with the families, which can sometimes feel like the last thing on your mind when you’re first teaching (until conferences, that is). Creating a relationship with what’s best for the child in mind is critical, especially in the field of special education; it opens you up to be a team with families to problem-solve what will work best for the child.

I can remember in graduate school when a professor explained that sending home positive notes about children is an important strategy for communication with families– to always start out on a positive note. I took this and made it a to-do for myself as a teacher. Reflecting about it in terms of the whole picture has led me to what I think is a better way of framing this strategy and advice:

As a teacher, you are a professional who works with the child and the family to help the child be more successful in the world. In order to make the most powerful impact, there needs to be a relationship with the family– not just a tally of triumphs and challenges communicated to the family. Both the positive and more challenging notes should be about who the child is– not just what the child did. Highlighting your understanding of the child is what will build your relationship with the family; it needs to be thoughtful and sincere.

The moments you live for when you teach– the triumphs– when feelings are expressed with words, concepts are understood, or a splash of independence comes out, those are the moments that families live for too. Being realistic and compassionate will give those moments the celebration they deserve.

 

On a connected note: Click here